By John Redwood.

We voted for Brexit because we once again wanted to live in an independent country.

We want our laws and taxes settled in Parliament by MPs that we can vote out of office if they do not please.

Elections empower voters to get change. A sovereign Parliament can do what it takes to promote the freedoms and prosperity of the British people.

In 2019 we had to vote again to get Brexit through owing to the obstructions of all too many MPs. The voters showed they knew the way to get their will done by removing many of the MPs who were thwarting Brexit. Now we are legally out of the EU the government needs to do more to exercise the Brexit freedoms we have gained.

There have already been some good wins from exit.

We no longer have to make large contributions to the EU. As promised NHS spending has increased, by more than the savings from Brexit so far.

We no longer have to make large contributions to the EU. As promised NHS spending has increased, by more than the savings from Brexit so far.

We no longer have to accept the accumulating debts and liabilities of the EU. Since we left the EU has started to borrow large sums in its own name to spend mainly in the financially stressed  countries of the Union. All that debt becomes a burden on the taxpayers of all  the member states, the only source of money to pay for it.

Out of the EU we were able to pursue our own vaccine and covid strategy, getting to a vaccine earlier than the EU and allowing us to get out of lockdown before many continental countries.

We are pressing ahead with different approaches to the regulation of science and medical advance, to assist in the development of UK excellence in those fields like gene editing. Faced with a shortage of drivers over lockdowns, we were able to flex our regulations temporarily  to help solve the problems. We cancelled VAT on female hygiene products and suspended it on green investments for five years. 

The wild pessimism of Remain forecasts for the economy did not come true when we voted to leave.

The wild pessimism of Remain forecasts for the economy did not come true when we voted to leave.

We did not see a rise in unemployment, a fall in house prices, a rise in interest rates in 2016 on the vote nor in 2020 on departing. Our trade with non EU countries is expanding, and we have completed a series of new trade deals with non EU countries.

We may well soon join the  very large Trans Pacific Trade Partnership, something we could not do as members of the EU.

We may well soon join the  very large Trans Pacific Trade Partnership, something we could not do as members of the EU.

We have been able to rebuild old valued friendships and alliances. The UK damaged important ties with Australia, New Zealand and Canada on joining the EEC. Today we are building a wider relationship on the back of our 5 Eyes Intelligence grouping and with new trade and investment links  possible.

Many of us are far happier now we are out.

We are impatient to show more Brexit wins by changing laws and repealing taxes the EU imposed.

Our happiness resides in the knowledge that our Parliament can  now make the right decisions and laws for us if it wishes, and we can change the Parliament if it refuses.

The Rt Hon John Redwood is the Conservative MP for Wokingham, and has been an MP continuously since 11 June 1987.

Read John Redwood’s Diary by clicking here.

1 COMMENT

  1. The best news is that we are selling far less to Johnny Foreigner.

    * Researchers at Aston assessed the impact of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement between the EU and the UK

    * UK exports fell by an average of 22.9% in the first 15 months following the deal
    Variety of UK products exported to EU down by 42%

    New export figures from the UK’s Office for National Statistics that UK exports collapsed to the EU’s largest markets of Germany, France, Italy and Spain.

    Goods and services exports to the USA and China have slumped as well.

    That will teach them that they need us more than we need them.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here