By Alex Story.

If a cat has nine lives, how many does Boris have? Many, it turns out.

Like a superhero in a comic strip, he seems to have the power to scupper the dastardly plans of his multi-faceted enemies.

He leaves them shaking their emasculated fists in the air, cursing their luck and promising to come back yet again to bring him and his band of merrymen down for good. Yesterday was no different. The sense of inevitability was palpable as his plane approached our shores.

“Like a superhero in a comic strip, Boris seems to have the power to scupper the dastardly plans of his multi-faceted enemies. He leaves them shaking their emasculated fists in the air, cursing their luck”

Indeed, when he left the Caribbean in the morning, only a small handful of die-hard Boris supporting MPs had dared put their names to his new leadership bid. By the time he landed, well over 100 MPs had put their names to his campaign to come back as Prime Minister.

This support will enable him to take his case to the membership in a potential run-off against Rishi Sunak, his former Chancellor. The winner will gain the leadership of the Conservative Party and become Prime Minister.

The odds of Rishi winning the membership against Boris are very low. Rishi is a smart, erudite man. He comes across very well and has a great story to tell.

However, he is seen by many as the genesis, fairly or unfairly, of much of the political instability we had to go through lately. His bid for the leadership last summer was too slick. As a result, the membership saw him as Brutus. The casus belli?

Rishi registered his “readyforrishi.com” domain name in preparation for his leadership campaign website on December 23rd 2021, more than six months before Boris’ totally unnecessary defenestration.

Rishi was not able to shake off the tag of Regicide during the long summer leadership campaign. That, more than any other reason, is why he lost to Liz Truss. Having been defeated by her, more embarrassing in every way than even Gordon Brown or Theresa May, what are the odds, if the game is not rigged, that he will win against Boris? The question answers itself.

The likelihood, therefore, of a third iteration of Boris Johnson as Prime Minister is very high. It did not always feel that way.

After the local elections last May, which were relatively good news for the Conservatives and bad for Labour and winning the “Vote of No-Confidence” in June, Boris ought to have been able to look forward to seeing out his term and face the electorate.

After all, the Conservative Party rules stated that another “vote of no confidence” could only take place a year after the previous one. The rule makes sense. It was designed to provide some stability to a political structure that is notoriously shaky.

However, a small group of Tory MPs, perhaps due to soaring July temperatures and fuelled by cheap Italian Prosecco, lost their patience and their minds.

However, a small group of Tory MPs, perhaps due to soaring July temperatures and fuelled by cheap Italian Prosecco, lost their patience and their minds. These MPs representing only 15 percent of the entire body of the Conservative caucus in parliament undermined the ballot box for the sake of short-term expediency and their careers.

Using the pretext of the hapless Chris Pincher, they decided to remove the man, who won the largest share of the popular vote and the largest Commons’ majority in decades. He must go, they said, rules be damned.

But a game without rules is not a game; it is a brawl – and becomes completely unpredictable. When they managed to force Boris out, many felt that was the end of him. They thought that with the deed done, they had won. In their hubris, they revealed themselves to be free of principles, foresight and nerve. However, the facts never really fit the narrative.

To make matters much worse, our small clique of Conservative MPs played right into the hands of their enemies, whose ultimate aim is to neutralise the idea of democracy.

Democracy in their mind is the fundamental problem because it is, when properly conceived, a constant negotiation between a multiplicity of views, each of which is as valid as the next. That, in short, is what legitimate government is based on. Legitimacy comes through consent. And that can only be achieved via the ballot box, in which every eligible person’s view is worth as much as that of his neighbour.

For a stable society to function, the ballot box must remain sacrosanct and visibly affect public policy. That though is a deeply frustrating element for powerful interest groups. They consider that they know better; we know that they do not.

In fact, much of their theories when applied to the real world turn into actual catastrophes. The simple reason for this is that their core assumptions are limited and wrong.

At the root is their belief in the supremacy of international law over domestic considerations. The upshot of that view is that international rules must be enforced on our people regardless of the deep damage that these might cause on our Islands.

If you, as an individual, dare to complain you are the problem – never their theories. The small group of MPs who plotted to undermine Boris must realise the damage they have done and seek forgiveness.

They trashed our constitutional order, tore the Tory Party apart, removed the legitimately elected leader of our country for short term gains, forced a leadership campaign between two candidates who never had the charisma to carry the country, and ended up giving us the most humiliating, debilitating, short-lived government in our glorious history.

But, should he come back as our Prime Minister, he must understand that his only friend is the voter. He has none in the Civil Service.

Two things we can pick out of the ashes of their machinations:

Firstly, we now know who in our politics is bent on our further national humiliation starting with the likes of Jeremy Hunt and the team he promoted during his short stint as UK’s first Generalissimo since Cromwell;

Secondly, the machinery of state, along with its many allies, will never stop trying to show we, the Plebs, were wrong to vote to Leave. We will never be forgiven.

This trial of strength will keep going, perhaps for decades. For this, Boris will need all the political lives he can get.

But, should he come back as our Prime Minister, he must understand that his only friend is the voter. He has none in the Civil Service.

Do not let us down. The gloves must come off.

Alex Story is a former Olympian, Conservative parliamentary candidate and one of the organisers of the Bring Back Boris petition.

Sign the petition to Bring Back Boris:

This article first appeared in the Express on Sunday 23 October 2022.

Picture by Andrew Parsons / No 10 Downing Street. Photo licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic License.

9 COMMENTS

  1. Thank you Alex I feel so much happier reading your posts This is so good I cannot wait for Boris to be back at the front Thanks so much for keeping our hopes up Alex and most importantly telling us the truth

  2. I hope & pray that if Boris is again our wonderful Prime Minister, the the first job he does is sack those 59 back benchers that started his downfall. Here’s to Bojo being our PM he is the only man to put things to right.
    💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙💙

    • Rishi’s ousting of Boris is not long enough ago for the members to forgive him.

      Let Boris be PM now – Rishi has plenty of time to be PM in a few year’s time.

  3. Rishi’s ousting of Boris is not long enough ago for the members to forgive him.

    Let Boris be PM now – Rishi has plenty of time to be PM in a few year’s time.

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