Why call an election now? Did Rishi fear the return of Farage or did he just jump before he was pushed? And what now for the soul of the Conservative Party? Could it be just the thing to bring back Nigel? asks John Longworth.

Rumours abound and pundits analyse Mr Sunak’s “why now?” moment.

Whatever the actual motives, what really matters is the policy suite of the next government and their determination and capability to implement those policies, the future of an independent and prosperous Britain depends upon it.

Nonetheless, it is worthwhile for a moment considering this in the context of a rushed election and what happens afterwards.

Why so rushed? None of the multitude of explanations add up. Was it that interest rates wouldn’t be cut and the economy will tank, inflation will rise and Rwanda flights won’t take off? All of these things run contrary to the likely events.

Absent a catastrophe like a war, inflation will gradually glide down. Unless on a wrecking mission the Bank of England would cut interest rates in the summer, the U.K. will grow faster than major EU states. There may have been a denouement over Rwanda and the ECHR.

It may be that No 10 feared the return of Mr Farage and wanted to shoot the fox, but really? Deciding the election timing only on this? And the fox isn’t dead. On the contrary, a moment will come I suspect when Mr Farage is politically very much alive.

Nigel Farage could make a comeback after the UK election – Copyright Conservative Post

Then we are told that Mr Sunak wanted out, exhausted by the dratted electorate not recognising his qualities, such as they are.

There is, however, another explanation, that the trajectory of letters to the Chairman of the 1922 committee was terminal. Seeing this Mr Sunak decided to jump before he was eventually pushed.

There is, however, another explanation, that the trajectory of letters to the Chairman of the 1922 committee was terminal. Seeing this Mr Sunak decided to jump before he was eventually pushed.

More importantly, this also pointed to another crucial matter for the Cameron, Haig, Heseltine cabal: the future of the Conservative Party. The vitally important task of eliminating the right thinking rump within the Parliamentary Party and wresting back control of the choice of leader from the membership. We have already seen them try to reject Lord Frost from the Party.

Having at last woken up to the possibility that the Conservatives may lose the election, it is now seen as an opportunity to lose the pesky red wall MPs and those on the right.

Mr Haig has already called for a decent period of reflection after the election to choose a new leader, long enough to change the rules no doubt.

With Central Office choosing candidates and the Parliamentary Party the leader, never again will the Conservatives be invaded by an upstart like the “Whig” Margaret Thatcher, instead be assured of a Tory through and through. A return to the real Conservatives, protecting their slice of the cake in the form of the wealth of the vested interests while overseeing decline elsewhere. No upsetting of the apple cart by entrepreneurs, economic disrupters or wealth creators. Not only unravelling the Thatcher legacy but indeed putting at risk even the agricultural and free trade reforms of the early 1800s as we salami slice by stealth, back into the protectionist EU fold. Something which Labour will gladly lend a helping hand to.

Truly, this is once again heading to the politics of the 1970s, two headed mono party of the mulch in the middle, LibLabour or ConSocialist.

Truly, this is once again heading to the politics of the 1970s, two headed mono party of the mulch in the middle, LibLabour or ConSocialist.

Neither want to control migration as they see it as preferable to real growth which requires real change. They care not about the NHS as they don’t have to use it. Housing shortage merely means inflated asset prices, their assets. Net Zero is a great tool of control and completes the suite of virtue signalling along with overseas aid, notwithstanding that the U.K. has now fallen to 28th wealthiest country based on GDP purchasing power per person. Plenty of cheap labour, no need to invest in productivity or infrastructure.

There is no telling what will actually happen in this upcoming election. There is widespread disillusion which might lead to a low turnout. Those fed up of the Conservatives might decide to vote after all seeing the horrors of the Labour Party. Or they may be so determined to give the Conservatives a punishment beating that the turnout is high. Reform may shock Labour by winning Labour seats. Any of these may lead to a hung Parliament. The polls failed on Brexit , they may do so again.

Whatever the outcome, we may see a gaping void on the right of politics after the election and a battle for the soul of the Conservative Party.

Cometh the moment cometh the man, it may be Mr Farage’s last role of the dice.

By John Longworth

John Longworth is an entrepreneur, businessman, Chairman of the Independent Business Network of family businesses and a former MEP.

1 COMMENT

  1. The tory opposition will be stuffed with One Nation remainer wets who will grab any safe seats going. Filth the lot of them.

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